Writing in Science: Practical Tips Academic Writing Science Communication
Practical Tips: Hyphens
agreement

and/or

apostrophes

article use

British vs American

capitalisation

compare to/with

conjunctions

dates & numbers

dangling participle

eponymic terms

hyphens

-ic vs –ical

italics

jargon

like vs such as

nominalisation

numbers

faulty parallelism

passive voice
prepositions

punctuation

sentence structure

showed

spell check
split infinitives

tense

that vs which

unusual plurals

verbiage

word confusion

 
Rules for using hyphens  -  or not!

**use is continually evolving – check!

Language in transition

  • 2 words --- hyphenated word --- 1 word
  • sea floor --- sea-floor --- seafloor
  • deep sea --- deep-sea --- deepsea

Using hyphens:

  1. Language in transition:
  2. When 2 or more words form a single adjective or noun
  3. When there are several modifiers to make the meaning less ambiguous.
  4. Modifiers with numbers and units
  5. Sometimes with prefixes (list of exceptions)
  6. When there is a potential for visual confusions because of repeated letters:
  7. Sometimes verbs need hyphens to indicate correct meaning:
  8. E-terms: where “e” stands for “electronic”

Or not using hyphens:

  1. When a compound modifier contains an adverb that ends in –ly, the two words are never hyphenated.
  2. Some well-established terms drop the hyphen
  3. For Latin phrases used adjectivally
  4. For letters used as modifiers in scientific terms
  5. Compound modifiers involving a comparative or superlative adjective

... for examples see .ppt

REFERENCES

Boyle T, Sullivan KD. The Gremlins of Grammar. McGraw-Hill ©2006 pp 20, 46-47, 51

Strunk W, White EB. The Elements of Style. 4th Ed. Allyn & Bacon, USA © 2000 pp34-35

Feigenbaum I. The Grammar Handbook. Oxford University Press © 1985.

 
 
Questions? Suggestions? contact: elinor.bartle<at>uib.no