Writing in Science: Practical Tips Academic Writing Science Communication
Practical Tips: "like" vs "such as"
agreement

and/or

apostrophes

article use

British vs American

capitalisation

compare to/with

conjunctions

dates & numbers

dangling participle

eponymic terms

hyphens

-ic vs –ical

italics

jargon

like vs such as

nominalisation

numbers

faulty parallelism

passive voice
prepositions

punctuation

sentence structure

showed

spell check
split infinitives

tense

that vs which

unusual plurals

verbiage

word confusion

 

The word "like" has many meanings and uses.

Many are not part of formal writing, only of informal writing and oral language.

like - excludes

like = resembling, comparison, similar to

such as - includes

such as = for example, including, ...

1) I enjoy playing sports such as football and baseball.
(= I enjoy playing footbal and baseball)

2) I enjoy playing sports like football and baseball
(= I enjoy playing sports that are similar to football and baseball ... but not necessarily football and baseball!!)

 

Steve has recordings of many great saxophonists such as Ben Webster and Lee Konitz. Steve wants to be a great jazz saxophonist like Ben Webster and Lee Konitz.

Like vs such as ppt

 
 
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